East Texas Paranormal

Investigating paranormal activity in East Texas

Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Dr Rita Louise and the truth about the Nephilim

leave a comment »


Dr. Rita Louise, ND

Dr. Rita Louise, ND (Photo credit: networker)

Dr Rita Louise and the truth about the Nephilim

This is a new educational and thought provoking video put together by one of our newest members. She is an author and radio show host. Soon she will have a listing on our East Texas Paranormal members page. For now you can find more of her videos on YouTube. You can find information about her radio show and archives of prior shows at Just Energy Radio. If all else fails you can find links to her shows, speaking engagements and books at Soul Healer. She and East Texas Paranormal Founder, Martha Decker already have a few speaking engagements scheduled for 2013. Those should be posted soon. In the meantime, sit back and watch Dr Rita in action and welcome her to East Texas Paranormal. We would love to hear your comments about Dr Rita Louise and the truth about the Nephilim.

Dr. Rita Louise

Dr. Rita Louise (Photo credit: networker)

Written by Martha Hazzard Decker

January 15, 2013 at 7:11 pm

Granbury Texas Paranormal Expo

leave a comment »


20120512-110349.jpg

If you live near Granbury this might fill your day with networking, fun, information, readings and speakers. It only costs $5 to attend and it’s at the conference center.

You can find people like Dr Rita Louise, where you will find East Texas Paranormal, and Jeromy Jones with Paranologies for starters. Come by say hi and see who else has a booth or is speaking.

 

 

Written by Martha Hazzard Decker

May 12, 2012 at 11:33 am

Paranormal? Earling Possession – Anna Ecklund – Last Sanctioned Exorcism – Begone Satan

with 4 comments


Paranormal? Earling Possession – Anna Ecklund – Last Sanctioned Exorcism – Begone Satan

by Martha Hazzard-Decker

Gustave Doré, Depiction of Satan, the antagoni...

Image via Wikipedia

Paranormal? Earling Possession – Anna Ecklund – Last Sanctioned Exorcism – Begone Satan. This is possibly one of the most publicized possessions during the twentieth century. It was written about in Begone Satan by German author Reverend Carl Vogl There is a plethora of information one can find on the Internet about this event. Rosemary Ellen Guiley wrote about the case in the book, “The Encyclopedia of Demons & Demonology.” She states the Earling Possession occurred in 1928 with the possession of Anna Ecklund  that multiple entities were within one victim. The exorcisms in Earling, Iowa totaled 23 days and included three sessions. It’s a fascinating account of an event that is not a fairytale and one that would be good to  cover for new paranormal investigators. While it’s extremely rare, this does occur and is serious and should not be taken lightly.

Ecklund was born in the Midwest section of the U.S. in 1882.   She was raised as a Catholic and was devout in her faith. According to Guiley’s book, Ecklund started showing symptoms of possession such as a revulsion to  to holy objects, the inability to enter church and disturbing thoughts about sexual acts and becoming totally possessed by at 14 years of age in 1908. She traveled and went to visit her Aunt Mina, who was a reputed witch, according to Reverend Carl Vogl and mentioned in his book, “BeGone Satan!”  The books states her aunt caused her possession by placing spells on herbs used in her food. The book states that Father Theophilus Riesinger, a Capuchin monk from St Anthony in Marathon Wisconsin completed a successful exorcism on Ecklund in 1912 but she became possessed again after her father heaped curses on her, wishing her to be possessed. Father Theophilus Riesinger once again tried to exorcize Ecklund in 1928.

This is a quote from the forward of the  book,

“Letter from a doctor

Dr. John Dundon, Physician and Surgeon
1228 E. Brady St., Milwaukee, Wis

Rev. Celestine Kapsner, O.S.B.
St. John’s Abbey
Collegeville, Minn.

Dear Father Kapsner:

We wish to endorse your pamphlet “Vade Satana”; as a potent aid to faith in the value of sacramentals, relics of the saints, and prayer. No more vivid picture has been presented to us of the losing battle against the “camp of Christ.” Nothing has made our insistent floundering from the “camp of Christ” to the “camp of the devil” appear so absurd. The memory it has instilled of the hatred of Satan and the eternal misery of his permanent army, evokes a continuous inventory of one’s life, savoring of the minuteness of the final judgment. That it will save many souls we have no doubt. That some will borrow fruitless fright is also possible, but for them one must say that if the picture is terrible the real thing must be worse. Agony is the lot of all at least once.

Satan has seemed too unreal. It would be a pity if this pamphlet were to be suppressed because some weak souls have been made to sense him more vividly than the author intends. We were granted an interview with the exorcist, Father Theophilus, after reading your account of the diabolical possession. We treasure the experience as an intimate glimpse into the life of a pious priest very gifted in a specialty which should command the patronage of the medical profession, rather than to be allotted to the realm of superstition or necromancy. We anxiously await his complete report of the Earling

Yours very truly,

J. D. Dundon, M.D.”

Father Gary Thomas from California, who the movie, “The Rite” was about speaks to a local news station about real life exorcisms. This can give you some current information about priests of today and that they do perform exorcisms on real people.

Guiley continues in her  book that “The ancient ritual began in earnest the next morning. Father Theophilus had several of the strongest nuns hold Anna on a mattress laid upon an iron bed, and her clothes were bound tightly around her to prevent her from stripping herself. With Father Theophilus’ first exhortations Anna’s mouth clamped shut and she fell unconscious, followed almost immediately by an extraordinary fear of levitation. Rising swiftly from the bed, she hung onto the wall above the door like a cat, and it took great effort to pull her down.” Father Theophilus had hoped to keep the exorcism a secret but the noises coming from a convent of Franciscan sisters in Earling told a tale that brought out many citizens. Father Steiger had agreed to help by opening his parish for the exorcism. During the exorcisms, Ecklund vomited and spit, her face distorted and head swelled, eyes bulged and her stomach grew so large and she became so heavy that the iron bed nearly broke. During this time she only swallowed small amounts of water and milk, eating no food. She was near death at times. She understood language she did not know, reacted to holy objects and was able to expose secret sins of those present. Father Steiger was harassed for allowing this to happen in his parish and was later involved in an auto accident that the devils predicted during the exorcism.

Ecklund was possessed by many other lesser devils and spirits. However, her principal tormentors were Beelzebub, according to Guiley’s book. Beelzebub eventually acknowledged that the curses of Ecklund’s father, Jacob, began her possession when she was 14 years old. While many things occurred during the long days and nights of the exorcisms, Father Theophilus prevailed and then on the morning of Dec. 23, 1928 the possession was over and Ecklund was no longer possessed.

Other accounts report the individual’s name as being Emma Schmidt. According to some of these reports there is an acknowledgement of the exorcism in Earling Iowa found in Papal records and that it did occur at the location reported.

A supplement at the end of “Begone Satan” is the testimony of a witness present during most of the exorcism and it is,

“Testimony of Theresa Wegerer, Father Steiger’s housekeeper

“I was a witness to almost the whole period of the exorcism of the Earling possession case and I can truthfully say, that the facts mentioned in Begone Satan are correct. Some of the scenes were even more frightful than described in the booklet. There is not the slightest doubt in my mind, that the devils were present and I will never forget the horrible scenes, vile, filthy, and dirty, as long as I live. All the nuns asked for a change and were transferred the next year.

“The woman came back to Earling over a distance of a thousand miles four months after the exorcism to make a novena of Thanksgiving. This was at the bidding of Christ Himself. During her stay she boarded with the Schimorowsky family. She told me how our Blessed Lord appears to her frequently and encourages her to be faithful.”

This seemed a fitting article with the recent release of the movie “The Devil Inside.” There is much more that could be written about this even or researched. .

More information about East Texas Paranormal and their affiliations are found on this site. The most recent affiliation is with the Paranormal Clergy Group.

Written by Martha Hazzard Decker

January 17, 2012 at 8:52 am

David Rountree Interview about the Probe, Part 2 ITC device for Paranormal Investigations?

with one comment


David Rountree interview about The Probe Part 2

by

Martha Hazzard-Decker

Author’s note – This author made several attempts to contact Andy Coppock to obtain his view regarding his modifications on the inductive probe. Coppock did not respond.

Dav Rountree interview about The Probe, Part 2, ITC device for paranormal investigations?. Just what is the Probe? Does it fall under the realm of Instrumental Transcommunication devices (EVP & ITC)? This is a question that can be debated probably all day long between ITC paranormal users and those investigating paranormal possibilities but in a more definitive and scientific manner. Part one of this interview was with author and ITC researcher April Slaughter. She believes the Probe works and contact can be made with the other side. In Part two one of the four Probe testers, David Rountree explains his thoughts about working with the Probe and if he thinks it works.

 

Slaughter had stated that there are other inductive probes out there and she didn’t want individuals to see photos of the Probe Andy Coppock gave her for fear that it could be mistaken with the common inductive probe. If you google Andy Coppock a vast array of information can be found about him and his device. However, there are not as many videos found showing Coppock using his Probe. It seems, according to quite a few comments on websites, that there used to be quite a few videos posted. There are numerous skeptics posting comments about how voice is coming from the device on these websites along with a few believers.

 

David Rountree has researched paranormal phenomena for about 25 years using a scientific point of view and is the director of Scientific Paranormal Investigative Research Information and Technology (S.P.I.R.I.T). Roundtree is also the co-director of New Jersey Paranormal Research Group along with several other groups, including those involving engineering. His primary research is studying electronic voice phenomena (EVP), environmental alterations present during possible paranormal activity and searching for the source. He has former law enforcement background and approaches paranormal investigations using his forensic training in conducting a search for possible reasons causing activity.

 

Rountree stated, “there isn’t a shred of evidence and no scientific explanation,” for voices coming through on the Probe. He explained that if an individual understands how the inductive probe works then they would understand how, “far fetched,” obtaining any EVP sounds. There are numerous inductive probes listed for sale on eBay. They come in a variety of sizes and prices. They are designed to work with tone test sets to identify and trace wires within a group with out damaging insulation. Using the inductive Probe is similar to using RF band radio and expecting it to, “magically pick up scanning words,” according to Rountree. He did say that using proper methods, “communication may be possible.”

 

Rountree said that EVP is possible, especially when using a dynamic microphone, but they are rare. In about 25 years of research Roundtree said he has about 25 recordings he would classify as an EVP. He described the use of Shack Hacks, ghost boxes and the Ovilus as entertainment and not actual professional, scientific tools. The Shack Hack is a radio which randomly scans AM and FM stations. Their speed of scanning can be adjusted by the user or maker of the modifications. The Franks Box operates with an AM chip and works the same as the Shack Hack, going up and down the AM band. According to Rountree, without an RF spectrum analysis three is no way to figure where the words are coming from using the Shack Hack or a ghost box.

 

“The Ovilus is a hoot and is sold for entertainment and not scientific.”  Tools like the Ovilus have a large amount of words programmed into their controls and when listening to it phonetically often words will make sense to the listener. There are 10,000 words programmed into a word memory chip that is triggered by environmental changes decided by the builder, according to Rountree. When it comes to individuals claiming they heard their name mentions, Rountree stated there are over 1,100 common names programmed into the vocabulary. This would stand to reason that should one be in a large group with the Ovilus running someone in the group might hear their name called out. “Any item sold as a phone app for $1.99 is designed to use when you get together with friends and you want to spook someone. It’s designed like an oracle.” Remember the old eightball nearly everyone had as a child? You would ask it a question then turn it over to reveal the answer to your question with a response of yes or no.

 

The Probe used by Coppock has been used by Rountree and others for years, but as a tool for work and not the paranormal. It’s used to trace out wiring. It’s used by moving down pins till you find the wire you’re looking for and it does pick up EMF, but the quality of the speaker is very poor said Rountree. He explained they have a cheap speaker and it would not be possible to hear a human quality voice coming from it. Roundtree stated he has seen videos of it in use and the voices allegedly coming from the Probe do fall into the human harmonic spectral range. Rountree said it is hard to ask him to believe it is coming from the Probe and to “buy into the myth.” Rountree said, “the voice is not coming from the wand (Probe) because of the quality.” Rountree does not know how Coppock is doing the voice with the Probe. He explained that anyone can do the sound analysis using files such as Audacity.  These programs can take apart the acoustic quality and will show that the voice Coppock said is coming from the Probe is definitely human and is “coming from somewhere.” Rountree said, “The Probe is getting interesting files but there is no scientific value to claim.”  The “ITC community has it wrong and there is fraud,” according to Rountree.  He said the key is in knowing EMF and EVP, how it works and how sounds are broadcast and received back. You can’t take one or two pieces of equipment to decide if it’s communication because that should take 10-12 pieces of equipment, according to Rountree.

 

Rountree believes one has a better chance of getting a good EVP by using a good quality recorder and a headset. One that he recommends is the ZOOM. He said a dynamic microphone and good headset should be used with recorders so one can hear in real time. “There is no button on them that says normal or paranormal.” What does Rountree do before he classifies a sound as an EVP? He will send the sound clip to five random  people he knows without telling them what he thinks it says and let them decide. If they say they hear what he heard, then he classifies it as an EVP.

 

Rountree is the author of “Paranormal Technology: Understanding the Science of Ghost Hunting.”  You can find a link for his book and additional information on his website Spin Investigations. This is Rountree’s first book to provide a scientific method to ghost hunting. It includes in-depth explanations, techniques, experiments and answers.

Written by Martha Hazzard Decker

December 5, 2011 at 9:01 pm

Orbs Debunked by Troy Taylor founder of American Ghost Society

with 5 comments


Orbs @ Sach's Bridge, Gettysburg, PA  Ghost hu...

Image by nikoretro via Flickr

“Orbs” Debunked!

American Hauntings

Presented with the written permission of Troy Taylor

Author of the GHOST HUNTER’S GUIDEBOOK & President of the American Ghost Society

Editor’s note: the image to the right is typical of what some
individuals believe to be orbs, but is usually dust or bugs.

For many years, during all of my writing on ghosts and paranormal phenomena, I have maintained that nothing that I have written has ever been meant to be the “final word” on anything related to the paranormal. However, this section is actually meant to be the “final word” (or rather MY “final word”) on the subject of “orbs”:

Enough with the “orbs” already! “Orbs” are not evidence of the paranormal. They are not ghosts and they are not even “unexplained”!

How can I say this when I maintain there are no “experts” on the paranormal? Because so-called “orbs” have nothing to do with the paranormal! Let me back up a moment and say then I’m not talking about anomalous lights and globes of energy that are seen with the naked eye, I’m talking about those pesky, transparent balls that seem to show up in photos and have been claimed for more than a decade to be “evidence” of ghosts.

Many of the “orb photographs” that turn up on Internet websites or in books seem to come from cemeteries but they actually have an annoying habit of showing up almost anywhere. They have become the most commonly reported types of “paranormal photos” claimed by “ghost hunters” in recent years.

I began debunking the vast majority of “orb” photographs in the middle 1990s, around the same time that I began the controversy over using low-end digital cameras for paranormal investigation. The majority of “orb” photos from that time could be blamed on low resolution, low pixel cameras — but not all of them. Despite what has been seen and heard, there has never been any evidence whatsoever to suggest that these “orbs” are in any way related to ghosts.  Yes, they have often turned up in photos that are taken at haunted locations but, as my research started to show, they could turn up literally everywhere.

As mentioned, “orb” photos are the most commonly seen “ghost photos” today and you will probably see more photos on the Internet of these purportedly “mysterious” balls of light than of anything else. While I do believe that genuine photographs of paranormal “lights” exist, they are not as common as many people think. The reason for this is that it’s very hard to photograph something at the same time you are observing it. However, it’s been done a number of times over the years at spook light locations and even during investigations. In my book Ghosts on Film, which deals specifically about spirit photography and investigations, I present a number of cases from my files where other researchers and myself were able to photograph glowing lights at the time they occurred. Were they ghosts? I don’t know but I can say that I believe the lights were paranormal in origin — unlike “orbs”.

Despite the fact that I (along with many other researchers) have been trying to tell people that “orbs” are easily explained as a natural phenomenon for nearly a decade, those that I like to call “orb-a-philes” have continued to post “orb photographs” on websites, print them in books, display them at conferences and excitedly show them to me on their digital camera screens. When I suggest a possible explanation for the “orbs”, downplaying the idea that they are ghosts, I usually get the reaction that I described in the introduction to this book — anger, righteous indignation and a comment that I don’t know what I am talking about anyway.

So, rather than try and argue with every “orb-a-phile” that I come across, I’ll let this article do my arguing for me. I don’t plan to write about “orbs” ever again and so please spare me the angry emails that claim that I have no idea what I am talking about. This is the final opinion that I have come up with on “orbs” and keep in mind that it is my opinion — I’m not an expert because there aren’t any paranormal “experts”– but this is what I have come up with based on research that dates back over more than two decades. With that said, what follows are the reasons that  I do not believe that “orbs” have any place in the field of paranormal research:

A typical “orb photograph” is usually one that is taken in an allegedly haunted place and somewhere within the photo is a hovering, round ball. Some of these “orbs” appear to be giving off light, while others appear to be transparent.

It should also be noted that “orbs” were actually quite rare (if not nonexistent) before digital cameras became common. In the early days of low-cost, cheap digital cameras, some “ghost hunters” actually proposed that digital cameras are “superior for orb photography”. And since they were producing more “orb” photos, this was technically true. But the digital imaging chip is very different than traditional film photography and was far inferior until recent times. Some of the earlier, low-end digital cameras were made with CMOS chips and they would create “noise” in low-light photographs that would be mistaken for “orbs”. It seemed that when they were used in darkness, or near darkness, the resulting images were plagued with spots that appeared white, or light colored, and where the digital pixels had not all filled in. In this manner, the cameras were creating “orbs”, and they had no paranormal source at all.

The most common “orb” photos are merely refractions of light on the camera lens. This occurs when the camera flash bounces back from something reflective in the range of the camera. When this happens, it creates a perfectly round ball of light that appears to be within the parameters of the photo but is actually just an image on the lens itself. Many people often mistake these “orbs” for genuine evidence of ghosts, although I have never really been quite clear as to why that is. Most “orb” photos occur when the camera flash is used. Some of the photographers will insist that their flash was not on, which means it was and they didn’t know it. The automatic exposure control on most any standard 35 mm camera uses fill flash in all but the brightest light.

Even so, “orbs” don’t have to have a camera flash to be created. They can also be caused by bright lights in an area where the photo is being taken, by angles of light and by many types of artificial lighting.

But are lights and camera flashes the only thing that can cause “orbs” to appear? Far from it! Other objects that end up in front of the camera lens and are mistaken for paranormal images are dust, moisture, pollen, insects, snow, rain, hair, ash and scores of other semi-microscopic particles. In almost every case, the camera flash reflects on the surface of one of these particles and seems to “glow”, as one might expect a ghostly image to do.

I started experimenting with “orb” photos a number of years ago, using a variety of materials, like flour, salt, dust and cat dander, to simulate “orbs” with my camera. I was not really that surprised to learn how easy it was to duplicate what so many people thought were ghosts using these ordinary items. The one argument that always intrigued me from the “orb-a-philes”, though, was: why, if “orbs” were not paranormal, did they so frequently turn up in photos taken at haunted locations?

I decided to research “orb” photos from graveyards, which I had seen scores of over the years. Keep in mind that I have often been openly critical of ghost hunting in cemeteries anyway.  By that I mean, actually just going out to cemeteries and shooting photographs and hoping to capture something on film. While this is great for the hobbyist, I don’t feel that it’s serious research. Needless to say, I have been harshly criticized for this view. In spite of this, I have not changed my mind about the fact that random “ghost hunting” is not an investigation. And if this isn’t reason enough to discourage this kind of activity; I soon had another reason for taking this view.

With three other researchers, I went out to a cemetery that we picked at random on a warm summer night and took several rolls of film. We had no readings, stories or reports to justify the decision, but just took photos anyway. After having them developed, we discovered a number of the photos were filled with semi-transparent “orbs”.

On a hunch, we then went to a nearby football field that was roughly the same size as the cemetery we had already visited. We walked around for a few minutes and again shot a few rolls of film. I was unfortunately not surprised to find that these photos were also filled with “orbs”. Was the football field haunted? Of course not!

What we did was walk around both areas and stir up dust and pollen from the grass. When we took the photos, these particles in the air caught the reflection of the camera flash and appeared to be “orbs”. We also discovered that such photos could be taken after walking or driving on a dusty road. The dust particles would reflect the light, just as moisture can do, and make it seem as though the air was filled was “orbs”.

While the experiment really just reinforced a belief that I already had — namely that “orbs” are not paranormal — I do think that it was worthwhile if even one “orb-a-phile” might see the results and question some of the photos that he or she has been presenting as genuine.

After publishing this research, I was sure that this would be the end of people sending me photos of “orbs” and asking me to justify their belief that they had captured a ghost on film, but it wasn’t. In fact, people still send them to me on a regular basis and they usually follow it up with their arguments as to why they are sure their “orbs” are real.

THE LAST WORD ON “ORBS”?

So, should we discount all “orb” photos? No, I don’t think that we should. As stated earlier, I do believe that there are genuine, paranormal images that appear and which are sometimes captured on film. These visible lights are a semi-common phenomenon but whether or not they signal the presence of ghosts is still open to debate. Regardless, I believe they are something paranormal in nature and we should continue to study them, as we have done for some time.

It’s the “traditional orb photos” that have become the bane of paranormal research and I think that it’s time that we retired this irrelevant theory for good. This will be the last appearance that “orbs” make in any of my publications and hopefully, we’ll see them start to fade from the spotlight of paranormal research once and for all.

Editor’s note: this article has not been changed from Mr Taylor’s version on his web site. Thank you for allowing ETX Paranormal to reprint this article.

Bump in the Night Newsletter is a FREE newsletter by Troy Taylor

If you are looking for an American Ghost Society Rep to help you use this AGS link to find one, including ETX Paranormal. (side note that our link shows as Cedar Creek Lake Paranormal Research)

Written by Martha Hazzard Decker

March 27, 2011 at 8:13 pm

%d bloggers like this: